Book Review: String Frenzy

 

If you’ve been quilting for any time at all, you probably have fabric scraps, including strips and strings. If you’re looking for projects where you can use these bits and pieces, you need to check out the projects in String Frenzy by Bonnie K. Hunter.

 
Photo courtesy of C & T Publishing

Photo courtesy of C & T Publishing

 

This latest book by the scrap quilting queen is full of gorgeous patterns, all using leftover strips and strings of fabric. The quilts in this book are large, but could definitely be scaled down to make smaller projects, such as table runners or lap quilts.

 
Photo courtesy of C & T Publishing

Photo courtesy of C & T Publishing

 

If you’re familiar with any of Bonnie’s previous books, you’ll know how much information she includes on getting your scrap fabrics organized and ready to be used in projects. This information in itself is worth the price of the book! It’s definitely worth reading all of the helpful content in String Frenzy that Bonnie provides on getting a scrap system going so you can always have your extra fabric pieces ready to use in any project.

 
Photo courtesy of C & T Publishing

Photo courtesy of C & T Publishing

 

String Frenzy includes 12 projects from scrap fabric and each pattern follows a similar format with text as well as a section called “At a Glance” for visual instructions.

Click on the image below to see more detailed information on String Frenzy and the beautiful quilts in it.

Are you a scrap quilter? If so, give me a “yes” in the Comments below.

Get your own copy of String Frenzy at https://amzn.to/2I7kEw2 and start clearing out that scrap bin.

Creatively,

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Print
 

P.S. Are you serious about improving your quilting? Do you want to connect with other committed quilters in a supportive, safe environment?  If you answered “yes” to these questions, you need to join The Quilter’s Way. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now.

P.P.S. Did you know that you can sign up to receive emails full of FREE quilting goodness? Click here to receive FREE content directly in your email inbox every few weeks from Chatterbox Quilts. I know you'll be glad you did!

P.S. I am an Amazon affiliate and, if you purchase items by clicking through the links in this post, I will receive a small amount of commission. This doesn’t cost you any more $$$, but helps me to continue creating free content for you. Thanks!

What Feet and Accessories are Included with the Janome MC9450?

Have you ever bought a sewing machine and then needed to buy additional feet or accessories as they weren’t included with the machine? I’m sure we’ve all been there, but this isn’t the case with the Janome MC9450. This machine comes pre-loaded with all the feet you’ll need whether you are a quilter or another type of sewist.

 
 

As a quilter, you are looking for a machine that has an accurate ¼” foot, a walking foot, and a free motion foot The Janome MC9450 has you covered with an assortment of feet in all of these areas. There are several foot choices for stitching that perfect ¼” seam (any deviations are definitely operator error in my case!) from the O foot – with or without seam guide - to the definitely-my-favourite HP foot and needle plate.

If you like to use a walking foot to add borders or binding, you now have the choice of either the AD Dual Feed foot or the new HP2 AcuFeed Flex professional grade foot. You’ll quickly become obsessed with this foot which is the perfect combination of a ¼” foot as well as a walking foot. It doesn’t get any better than this for stitching on long borders or binding strips since that perfect ¼” seam is guaranteed.

 
 

When it comes to free motion or ruler quilting, again, you’ll have all the feet you’ll need with the Janome MC9450. Whether you want to do some ruler quilting with the QR Ruler Work foot or need to do some free motion quilting around an appliqué with the QV Free Motion Quilting Zigzag foot (yes, it’s for variable zigzag stitching, but its dish-shape works so well to avoid catching on appliqué pieces) , the Janome MC9450 comes pre-packaged with these and many more free motion friendly feet.

What if you’re a garment sewist? No problem! The Janome MC9450 has feet for that purpose too. The HP AcuFeed Flex foot can help when you want walking foot capability in a narrow area. Need to add a zipper to your dress or pillowcase? The Janome MC9450 comes with the E Zipper foot that allows you to stitch zippers with ease (i’ve used it for pouches). The Janome MC9450 includes the Automatic Buttonhole Foot  R with a Stabilizer Plate that allows you to create different buttonhole styles. You’ll also receive the Button Sewing Foot T so you can use the Janome MC9450 to sew on your buttons – no hand stitching required!

If you need help with blind stitching your hems (no one wants to see the stitches on hems!), you’ll find the Blind Hemming foot G very helpful. The Cloth Guide will help ensure that your seams are stitched exactly where they need to be and it is included with the Janome MC9450.

 
 

Now you’re probably wondering how you are going to store all of these feet and accessories. Again, the Janome MC9450 has you covered with a two-sided accessory storage bin that fits around the machine bed. New with this machine is the separate accessory case which has a lift-out tray and additional storage underneath it. Lots of room for the feet and accessories that came with the Janome MC9450 and room for any additional accessories you might purchase.

I’ve only mentioned a few of the feet and accessories included with the Janome MC9450. Click on the image below to see all that you’ll receive when you purchase the Janome MC9450. You’re going to be amazed!

Whether you’re a quilter or another type of sewist, I’d like to know what your go-to foot or accessory is on your sewing machine. Let me know in the Comments below.

Creatively,

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Print
 

P.S. Are you serious about improving your quilting? Do you want to connect with other committed quilters in a supportive, safe environment?  If you answered “yes” to these questions, you need to join The Quilter’s Way. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now.

P.P.S. Did you know that you can sign up to receive emails full of FREE quilting goodness? Click here to receive FREE content directly in your email inbox every few weeks from Chatterbox Quilts. I know you'll be glad you did!

P.S. I am an Amazon affiliate and, if you purchase items by clicking through the links in this post, I will receive a small amount of commission. This doesn’t cost you any more $$$, but helps me to continue creating free content for you. Thanks!

Facing a Quilt Part 2

One of my recent blogposts was all about how to face your quilt, rather than adding a binding to it. If you haven’t yet read that post, you can find it here.

This is such a great method for wall hangings as it uses up excess binding strips and small pieces of scrap fabric. It also avoids those pesky mitred corners (if you love mitring your binding corners, I’m sorry). It allows the border or background fabric to flow right to the edge of the project without the “stop” that the binding can cause.

 
Facing on Kay McK. table runner binding.jpg
 

Lots of quilters loved this technique and some of them had some questions. As the edges of the facing strips aren’t finished, they wondered if they might fray when washed. Others wanted to know if this technique would work for large bed-sized quilts. To answer all of their questions, I created another video and you can watch it by clicking on the image below.

Have you ever tried this technique on one of your quilt projects? Let me know how that worked for you in the Comments below.

Creatively,

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Print
 

P.S. Are you serious about improving your quilting? Do you want to connect with other committed quilters in a supportive, safe environment?  If you answered “yes” to these questions, you need to join The Quilter’s Way. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now.

P.P.S. Did you know that you can sign up to receive emails full of FREE quilting goodness? Click here to receive FREE content directly in your email inbox every few weeks from Chatterbox Quilts. I know you'll be glad you did!

P.S. I am an Amazon affiliate and, if you purchase items by clicking through the links in this post, I will receive a small amount of commission. This doesn’t cost you any more $$$, but helps me to continue creating free content for you. Thanks!

Easy Teacup Pincushion

Do you have a favourite coffee mug or tea cup that is chipped, but you just can’t bear to throw it out? Maybe you picked up a teacup at an estate sale (like that’s every happened to me!) just because you liked it and don’t know what to do with it. Let me show you how to make a pincushion out of it.

 
Teacup pincushion.jpg
 

You’ll need:

 Coffee mug or tea cup (saucer optional)

Fabric for the pincushion

Decorative trim

Polyester fill or similar stuffing

Glue gun

Needle and perle cotton or thick thread for basting

We’ll be cutting a circle out of the fabric that should be at least three times the diameter of the top of the mug or cup. This will vary depending on the mug or cup you are using.

 
Teacup pincushion Kim with supplies.jpg
 

Cut out the circle of fabric and run a basting stitch about ½” in from the raw edge. Be sure to knot your thread first and use large running stitches. Pull the thread out to the outside of the circle and do not knot it yet.

 Pull the basting stitching a bit so that the pincushion is starting to form and so that you can stuff it.

 Stuff the circle. You will need to pull the basting stitching in as you go along to contain it. 

Once the circle is filled, pull the basting stitch tight and knot off.

 Now get your glue gun fired up! Run a line of glue inside the cup, partway down the side – not too close to the top as we don’t want to see the glue. Press the pincushion down inside the cup or mug and squish it around until it is the way you like it. If you are using a teacup and have a saucer, glue the saucer to the bottom of the cup.

For extra decoration, you could glue trim or ribbon, bows, etc. around the top edge of the cup or mug – buttons or other decorative items.

For a step-by-step tutorial on creating a teacup or mug pincushion, click on the image below.

Enjoy your lovely personalized just for you pincushion!

Have you ever created a pincushion using a chipped mug or one that you’ve bought at the second hand shop? Leave me a comment below to tell me about your mug or teacup pincushion experience.

Creatively,

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Print
 

P.S. Are you serious about improving your quilting? Do you want to connect with other committed quilters in a supportive, safe environment?  If you answered “yes” to these questions, you need to join The Quilter’s Way. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now.

P.P.S. Did you know that you can sign up to receive emails full of FREE quilting goodness? Click here to receive FREE content directly in your email inbox every few weeks from Chatterbox Quilts. I know you'll be glad you did!

P.S. I am an Amazon affiliate and, if you purchase items by clicking through the links in this post ,I will receive a small amount of commission. This doesn’t cost you any more $$$, but helps me to continue creating free content for you. Thanks!

Book Review: Scrap-Basket Bounty

In Scrap-Basket Bounty, Kim Brackett shows you how to use your fabric scraps to create one block and then combine a number of these blocks to make a quilt. There is definitely an advantage to making one block several times to create a project. It allows you to get very good at your ¼” seams!

 
Image courtesy of Martingale Publishing

Image courtesy of Martingale Publishing

 

The projects in this book are lap-sized quilts or larger. Each of the projects uses a different block, but every block is square, with some being 8” x 8” or 10” x 10”, for example.

While there are 16 projects in Scrap-Basket Bounty, there are really many more patterns than this. Kim provides alternative design layouts with each project so you can decide which one you want to make. By simply turning the blocks, you create a totally different-looking design. I love this idea!

 
Image courtesy of Martingale Publishing

Image courtesy of Martingale Publishing

 

Kim shows you how to ensure that your quilt will turn out well using your scrap fabrics by explaining the importance of contrast between the main fabrics and the background fabrics. If you don’t have this contrast, the block design won’t be obvious – and all of your hard work won’t have turned out the way you wanted it to.

 The designs in Scrap-Basket Bounty are easy enough that any level of quilter could make them and they’re a great way to use up scraps.

 
Image courtesy of Martingale Publishing

Image courtesy of Martingale Publishing

 

I really like Kim’s idea of taking one simple block and creating a variety of quilt designs from it. While Kim provides 3 layouts for every project, you will probably be able to come up with more on your own. You could even create totally different looking quilts just by switching up the light and dark fabrics in these designs.

To see more of Scrap-Basket Bounty, click on the image below.

If you like pieced quilts and have lots of fabric scraps, check out Scrap-Basket Bounty by Kim Brackett.

Creatively,

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Print
 

P.S. Are you serious about improving your quilting? Do you want to connect with other committed quilters in a supportive, safe environment?  If you answered “yes” to these questions, you need to join The Quilter’s Way. The Quilter’s Way is the only quilting membership site that includes both training and an active, supportive online community. Don’t wait another day! Join now.

P.P.S. Did you know that you can sign up to receive emails full of FREE quilting goodness? Click here to receive FREE content directly in your email inbox every few weeks from Chatterbox Quilts. I know you'll be glad you did!

P.S. I am an Amazon affiliate and, if you purchase items by clicking through the links in this post ,I will receive a small amount of commission. This doesn’t cost you any more $$$, but helps me to continue creating free content for you. Thanks!